This blog has long held to a no-politics rule, and by extension no social issues.  I’m choosing to break that rule today.  The social justice issues that have come to a head in the last week-and-a-half are much bigger than politics; they are about the core of humanity itself.  Today’s post is a transcription of the excellent Black Lives Matter published by @pittfootball earlier this week.  There will be more social-justice themed content coming behind it (as well as topical football and basketball content as always).  I encourage you read, watch, consider, and ultimately act.  This is new ground for the Pitt POV, and it may well prove uncomfortable, but these are unprecedented times.  Speak up, and Hail to Pitt.

How you all doing, this is Shocky Jacques-Louis here at the University of Pittsburgh, and I just wanted to let everybody know…your voice matters.  You know…even if racism isn’t happening around you, it hasn’t happened once in your life, your voice matters, you know what I’m saying?  Even if you’re not the minority group being targeted, your voice matters.  Just…letting people know that you’re aware of the situation and how wrong it is matters, everything matters.  So…don’t be afraid to use your voice, everybody has a voice.  Shocky Jacques-Louis

Football has given me the opportunity to build some amazing relationships, and it’s also given me the opportunity to see things and issues through other people’s eyes.  During these heartbreaking and sad times I hope that change will follow, and follow quickly and that in the future the good will always conquer the evil.  Jimmy Morrissey

The events that have just taken place…these past couple of days in the United States and obviously these past couple of years are very saddening.  Now more than ever we need everyone to unite, we need everybody to come together.  We cannot make a change without you guys, we need everyone’s help… we need everyone’s support.  Todd Sibley

The tragic events of the past week for many of us have made it quite challenging to find the right words to say.  However I’ve found that in times like these it’s helpful to look to those we admire for words of wisdom and encouragement.  “What happened to George Floyd cannot be ignored.  Racism that exists today in all forms is unacceptable.  While I’m not able to relate to the discrimination that black and minority communities face daily, I will listen and educate myself on how I can help make a difference.  Together we will find solutions, the necessary dialog, and a collective effort” Sydney Crosby.  The only way we will solve the problems that we face as a nation today, is together.  Thanks and Hail to Pitt.  Cal Adomitis

Being very direct about it, it is sickening and unacceptable how black people and people of color are systematically oppressed and mistreated in this country.  It’s time for all of us to step up and unite all the good hearts to combat the bad.  This involves speaking up and out in uncomfortable situations involving microaggressions, blatant mistreatment and other topics many try to avoid.  As we move forward in time, remember all lives will never matter until Black Lives Matter, and to my people out there already taking a stand, remember, no justice, no peace.  Hail to Pitt.  Rashad Weaver

Nothing will change until innocent black lives are done being taken away from us.  Nothing will change until we stop saying everyone is equal, but black people are not treated as equals.  We need everyone to step up and do their part to change this world.  Speak out, go into the community and make a change.  We need to get from under our little shells or our worlds and do something about this.  Racism, sexism and ignorance are foes of the people, and so is silence.  Speak up, speak out and stand up.  Only then can we unite as one.  Bryce Hargrove

As a nation its time take a stand.  It’s time to stand for what’s right and not for what’s wrong.  It’s time for all of us to come together and unify as one, and to put an end to police brutality.  I’m tired of seeing people that look like me being killed and mistreated simply because of the way I look.  It’s time to bring justice, it’s time to end police brutality.  Black Lives Truly Do Matter.  Patrick Jones

It’s no longer enough to say “I don’t see color”.  As a nation we have to recognize color and notice the discrimination that comes with being black.  When I walk into Heinz field I am the starting Free Safety for the Pittsburgh Panthers, but when I leave that stadium I am another black man fearing that I might get mistreated for the color of my skin.  But it’s no longer enough to speak out about the blatant systematic injustices going on without taking action.  We need everybody united in demanding our political leaders to make necessary police reforms which hold them accountable for their actions, and ensures equality for everyone.  All lives can’t matter until Black Lives Matter.  Damar Hamlin

What’s up everybody it’s Tre Tipton from your Pitt Panthers I want to say we must come together right now in this time of hardship, we have a lot of things going on right now and I understand we’re in a pandemic, and I understand we’re going through a tough situation with police brutality and racism has not died since the 1940’s, and even longer than that, but if we come together in unity, then everything can be okay.  If we come together an appreciate one another, then everything can be okay.  We must recognize that our skin color doesn’t mean that you’re different.  That race doesn’t mean you’re different.  That sexual orientation doesn’t mean you’re different.  It’s the person you are.  So be a better person, and Love.  Tre Tipton

Editor’s Note:  I posted this piece to start a dialog.  I’d prefer that you keep it clear of politics, as the root of this issue is police brutality and systematic, endemic racism.  However this is a complex issue, and it may have political solutions.  I’m okay with conversation around political solutions.  I’m not okay with the naming or blaming of politicians or political parties (even though there may or may not be politicians or political parties that are contributing to the issue).  No topic (i.e. the naming and blaming of politicians and parties) could possibly be more divisive, and this is a time where we should ALL be coming together to support one cause.  “Fix the problem, not the blame.” – Sean Connery (in Rising Sun)

75 Things White People can Do for Racial Justice

Hail to Pitt

and lets not forget why this really does matter

Michaelangelo Monteleone

202 thoughts on “Your Voice Matters

  1. Editor’s Note: I originally removed the comment below, but at the urging of one of our readers I have allowed it to stand. No other comment could be more telling about the state of race relations in present day America, and why action needs to be taken to eradicate racism and ignorance. It deeply saddens me that this was the very first comment I received after I posted this article. Please note this comment contains inappropriate content.

    Dats good yt bend the knee if u rly wanna APOLOGIZE u send ur wifey n dotter over ri quik to bend the knee n suk my BIG BLAK DIK

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  2. a few of my thoughts …..

    — Police are just like any other segment of our society. It’s just a few that make it bad for the rest of them.

    — I don’t care if it far left or far right …. if it is ‘far’, it is less objective, more unreasonable and more dangerous

    — IMO, the recent kneeling down by football players and even the burning of the flag by anti-war protestors back in the 60s and 70s are not ultimate disrespect of the US flag or for the veterans who fought the wars …. that happened immediately after the end of the Civil War with the lynching of blacks which continued for another 7 decades or so. And of course, it continues in other ways today.

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  3. Thanks Maestro for allowing this discussion. A problem cannot be solved if it is ignored or not understood.

    Going to an integrated high school in the sixties, I had many black team mates I considered to be friends, although at the end of the day we went to our separate neighborhoods. I can still see the black girls crying in home room the morning after MLK was assassinated. I didn’t understand why. I had no comprehension of what they were going through and how difficult their lives were due to racism.

    Although we have come a long way, individual and systematic racism is still prevalent. Hopefully today’s protests will bring about more positive change.

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  4. Maestro, why I of course know why you removed the original post on this thread from Anonymous, I urge you to reinsert it of you are able to ….. it just reveals so much, and probably says a lot more than any other post you will see here

    Liked by 1 person

      1. You asked for civilized discussion. That does not meet the definition of civilized. That person is a coward to hide behind “anonymous” also. Good thing I’m not the monitor. I’d block him for life. Just my HO.

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  5. —Agree that the actions of a few officers raises issues for all officers. And I can only imagine how difficult it would be to remain “objective” as an officer when you consider the spectrum of things they deal with…

    —But a nephew had a bad “encounter” with a Pittsburgh police officer who, it turned out, had a long reputation for bad encounters. The story my nephew told was pretty scary, and he’s not even black. I think there should be more emphasis in this movement on how the police command structure deals with or doesn’t deal with officers who go over the line. My guess is that such behavior would become the norm, or escalate, for such officers, if not addressed. Some people just don’t have the make-up to be police officers, IMHO.

    —Course it’s the presence of camera-phones that has changed everything. I can imagine the day when all public places are covered by video and drones and “policing” is done remotely…

    —I was impressed by the statements made by the Pitt players. Made me remember how enjoyable it was to talk to several of them at the last LOI event…

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  6. I posted A long response. I had to sign in and it was lost. In retrospect it was probably better it was removed.
    Anyway, racism exists period.
    Black lives matter is a political creation. The left does not want nor will they allow a real conversation about race.
    All the riots are in liberal states and cities that have been under 1 party democratic control for decades.
    Defunding the police is so incredibly insane it is hard to believe it is a topic.
    New York
    Chicago
    LA
    Pittsburgh
    Minneapolis
    They have had decades to improve the black community. They have been in charge of their police departments. The leaders of the cities did nothing.
    I am sorry but anarchy is only going to make things worse for the poorer communities. The affluent are not hurt by shutdowns or riots. The poor get destroyed.
    KMAN

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    1. Slipper slope on politics KMAN but I’ll let it ride for now.

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      1. MM:
        This whole article is politics! I did not change the rule. Anyway, WWB a great idea to allow the first post.
        Whoever posted it, although a coward for hiding behind anonymous, has the absolute right to speak.
        I doubt he would be as tolerant to someone with a different opinion.

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        1. Sigh… it’s a lot of things. Politics is probably some of it, but it’s certainly not all of it. I’ll be posting an article later this week about a black friend of mine (who coincidentally played Defensive Tackle for a G5 team) who is routinely discriminated against in his own place of business. Mind you this a business that he owns and has invested his own money into. He walks in and his (largely white) clientele thinks he doesn’t belong there. They are literally cowering in fear of him when he walks in the door as a smiling, well dressed man wearing the logo of the very business he owns. Could you imagine that??? THAT is a much bigger issue than politics, and that kind of thing is one of many…(combined with many other things) that combined to build the giant mountain of dry tinder that was set off by the latest incident.

          You are right in one thing however, the leadership of cities (and states), REGARDLESS OF POLITICAL AFFILIATION has had years to remedy the problems in their police forces, but because nobody was saying anything about them, because the status quo was being kept, because nobody was complaining loudlyl enough, nothing was done. This is a sad fact. (and for the record NY has only been under dem leadership for six years…so your argument doesn’t entirely hold water.) And regardless of political leadership now and into the future, it’s the goal of these protests to get that change. De-funding the police may not be the answer, but reforming the police certainly is.

          And since we’ve gone down the political road, I would love to get your thoughts on the article below – written by a republican who improved this issue in his home state.

          https://www.cnn.com/2020/06/02/opinions/policing-reform-opinion-kasich-turner/index.html

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          1. Good editorial by Kasich and Turner. They suggest a far better approach than the knee-jerk calls for disbanding police departments. That said, where policemen are represented by unions, their leadership will need to embrace such oversight and convince its members to give up some control over how discipline is administered.

            Not as familiar with Turner’s work, but Kasich is a good man and a favorite son of McKees Rocks.

            Liked by 2 people

            1. Defunding is not disbanding the departments. It is moving some $ from the police to other areas to benefit other social causes. Seems to me it is better spent on re-training the police on appropriate ways to react during these incidents. I would bet the uncertainty of whether someone has a gun contrubutes to many of the overreactions by police to otherwise minor incidents.

              Liked by 1 person

  7. I urge you to watch the last episode of John Oliver who focuses on the culture of policing and how it has evolved into a military force that demands domination and sees the Black community as enemy territory.

    He also charts that evolution as emanating from the south which created a system of oppression in Black communities shortly after the civil war. The stress and lack of hope that permeates those communities is reinforced every day by a system and culture that encourages acting more like an occupying army than a public service.

    It is not a few bad apples it’s a system that is politically protected and insulated by laws that prevent law suits and the public’s ability to know about past abuses. Thus a need for transparency, accountability and removal of weapons of war from our public spaces.

    Ask any Black man you know about their experiences with the police and you will hear about fear, harassment and humiliation. This has been a pattern for 400 years.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. There is certainly racism in this country but I think you need to actually look at facts before you call the instances of white cops killing black men systemic. In fact, IT IS NOT.

    965 people were shot by cops last year and killed, 4% were white cops shooting unarmed blacks. That is not systemic.
    A cop is eighteen more likely to be killed by a black male than an unarmed black male is to be killed by a cop.
    The rate of death by police shootings is higher for whites and hispanics than it is for blacks.

    Freddie Gray’s horrible death in Baltimore took place in a city that is 45% black, the majority of city council is black, the top cop at the time was black, the majority of the commanders were black, the mayor is black and the AG is black. Systemic? By the way, this is also true in other major cities. Clevelend, Atlanta, Detroit, Philly, New Orleans and DC to name a few. In fact, this has been the case for decades.
    Maybe the social justice warriors should be asking these black leaders what the F they have been doing besides just trying to get reelected every year. Their lack of action is despicable.

    You want to talk about and solve horrible things impacting the black community. Let’s talk about the ignored issues that are much much worse…
    Chicago is 1/3 black, 1/3 white, 1/3 hispanic. 75% of the homicides are black on black. About 40 per month. Freaking 40!!!! Where are the protest? Where is the media outrage? Where is the kneeling? Where is BLM?

    I could go on and on. I won’t even mention how the killing of cops is twisted in the media and by some political leaders. I have friends that are cops, I have friends of all races. Racism is horrible, bad cops are horrible but this idea that cops are out to get black people is completely bogus.

    Liked by 4 people

    1. There are tons of huge racism issues, why is this the catalyst for the protests? The protests should be going on all the time. What started the kneeling in the first place? Another police incident of course.

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  9. Well I wrote something that was lost. Hope this brief summary posts. The covid spread across the world and governments did their best to stop it. These protests are spreading and I hope governments embrace them.

    Athletes in sports are predominately minority. I’ll never understand what blatant and subtle racism they face but I listen. I can protest, I can vote for change. But it’s up to elected officials to do something. Both parties haven’t done enough. Hopefully something good can come of this.

    racism and inequality does exist in America. It’s embedded in many of our structures from government to banking to policing to neighborhoods.

    Like the pitt players have said. We are all in this together and something like this tradegy should unite and not divide us. It’s time to take some action to make America better for all and not just the privileged few.

    Tex who listens, who is guilty of racism, who try’s to understand, who is willing to embrace change for the better

    Liked by 6 people

  10. Social/racial issues in America cannot be adequately dissected, examined & discussed, in an attempt to find solutions to such endemic issues in our society without considering the politics involved with such issues. The intertwined relationship of our politics with the sociology of our Nation makes it impossible to divorce “politics” from the discussion. That being said, I premise my comments by portraying such politics with very wide brush strokes of what our elected public officials are obligated to consider in performing the functions of their respective offices.
    Our Country has a dark legacy that persists to this day, that of a nation built with the assistence of indebted service by an entire race of involuntary participants, namely slaves. The Emancipation Act didn’t eliminate that legacy from our nation’s collective consciousness, it was simply a document that took a first step in it’s attempt towards inclusiveness of that segment of America’s citizenship that endured such human rights violations personally or as factor in their racial heritage.
    That being said, our Constitution aspires to Liberty & Justice for All, but even in this modern day & age those aspirations remain elusive in a practical sense for many in America. Until we as a society fully appreciate the ongoing factors that continue to perpetuate the subversive racism & inequalities that our minority citizens have to deal with on a daily basis, such society ills will continue to be evident.
    In regards to how all this relates to our University & it’s various athletic programs, this point is important to realize. For many young black men & women in America, college athletics is seen as a way out of their current situation, a chance to improve their opportunities in life, a shot at a higher education that they might not be able to afford on their own otherwise, a chance at stardom for the select few at the next level & in general just an opportunity for them to have future success in society that they may otherwise not get in their lives.
    Here is where I think the University of Pittsburgh is getting it right with their student athletes. IMO, Pitt is still interested with educating their scholarship athletes. This isn’t always the case with all institutions of higher learning. Some, who will remain nameless, are well known for prioritizing the “athlete” while minimizing the “student” aspects involved with recruiting their people all the while chasing the money that that institution will realize by that athlete’s effort. Unfortunately, when the latter occurs in such a misguided quest, concerned only with on field success, then that actually results in nothing more than a perpetuation that very same servitude that has historically plagued the black community historically. That is why I often mention the quality of the recruit that Pitt puts on scholarship beyond just their athletic prowess. At Pitt, we still adhere to the concept of educating our athletes in preparation for their future lives. Pitt looks beyond, to the recruits personal attributes, character, leadership qualities, intelligence, academic success, family support & the like. All of these factors improving the potential that such a student will find success in the classroom as well as on the field. And that is a very good thing to prioritize, IMO.
    For the majority of these student athletes will never realize the dream of becoming a millionaire due to their athletic skill set, but everyone of them can advance in society by utilizing their education acquired during their college experience IF they get the help that each one of them requires to be successful in that educational endeavor, culminating with a college degree. Getting back to the subject dominating the news today, when more & more of those types of successful minority graduates become seeded in our society, the better off the overall minority communities benefit from their experiences. This results in obtaining better role models for upcoming generations, more opportunities for people in minority owned businesses, more minorities involved in politics, in positions that could positively advance the concepts & legislation that promote true equality of all of our citizens that our Constitution eludes to.
    Occurrences such as these, repeated time & time again, individual by individual, graduating class after graduating class continually promotes advancement of those historically under privileged segments of our society, which subsequently is beneficial to our entire society. It’s a win-win situation!
    When I listened to these videos of our students expressing their concerns as well as their dreams for a better tomorrow, at the beginning of this post, I found myself filled with pride about the mission that our University has taken to heart, that being it’s responsibility to educate it’s student body, including those that just happen to be our scholarship athletes as well.
    Some may view my perspective as being naïve, maybe a liberal ideal that will never be seen as obtainable in our Country, but I would debate that POV because in America, to truly obtain any greatness in our society, that “greatness” should not be predicated by the level of success of the best off among us but rather by the opportunities for success for those among us that have had the least chance for advancement in American society. A chain is only as strong as the weakest link in it. America can do better.
    And as always, Hail to Pitt.

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Well said doc albeit a bit wordy. 🤠

      I do like Pitts mission to educate the athlete. I like the concept of scholar athlete. But reality tilts towards the money and many schools bend that way.

      The arc of Justice depends on us taking action to bend that arc.

      Tex

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Extremely well said. Thank you, Dr. Tom.
      Your essay, it seems to me, is in complete concurrence with how Narduzzi, Capel and the other Pitt coaches are leading (and recruiting for) their programs. And how they are leading their programsl, in the eyes of the Pitt administration, will always be the first priority.

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  11. Civilians are no different than the cops…….There are rotten apples in every bunch….. Cops, (who come in all colors) Whites, Yellows and Blacks. I think that’s been proven out over the past ten days. Me? Minding my own business, I’m just sitting here watching the wheels go round and round.

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    1. The solutions all seem reasonable and worth trying. I’m a bit disappointed that Narduzzi didn’t come out sooner but I understand. He’s behind his players and the movement and that’s all that matters. I hope some real change comes about but I’ll temper my expectations. These protests are good. Now it’s up to our elected representatives to enact some real and meaningful change. What change, how much and how far will be interesting to say the least. But something needs to be done and then are we all better off and more united. Again, I have hope but not wild exuberance.

      Tex

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  12. Greetings from Los Angeles.

    Let’s not get too distracted by the filthy diarrhea of racist, sexist speech or by the noisome flatus of specious proofs and tall tales. Speech that bludgeons the oppressed and comforts the oppressor is not free speech at all. Open the windows. Air out the room. There is so much work to do.

    Reading the statements of the Pitt football players fills me with pride and hope. They are so much wiser than I was 50 years ago.

    Black lives matter!

    HTP

    (CAS ‘73)

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  13. Did I miss something where the format on the POV has changed dramatically. Looks like Reed has finally taken his name off? I’m bad at changes but I’ll get use to it I suppose. Or is it just my cpu after I said I have little problems with wordpress?

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  14. Racism always takes me back to the song from “South Pacific,” of all places, called “You’ve Got to be Carefully Taught.”

    Here’s an excerpt of the lyric:

    “You’ve got to be taught
    Before it’s too late
    Before you are six
    Or seven
    Or eight
    To hate all the people
    Your relatives hate
    You’ve got to
    Be carefully taught“

    I’m afraid that’s a huge part of the problem… Being a parent is such an awesome responsibility because, consciously or not, you really do shape the outlook and prejudices of your children (for better or worse).

    And nice to see the wisdom of you wise POVers on display.

    Hail to Pitt.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Racism is something that is taught. Nobody is born a racist. But when you see (often sub consciously) racism in its subtle forms in everyday life, it becomes gradually accepted through experience. I don’t have the answers but I think it starts with listening and trying to understand.

      Tex

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  15. I won’t dive too deep here but racism has two sides to the coin. Racism isn’t always learned at home? You learn it on the streets. I won’t repeat the stupid retort that I had many black friends (I did and so many passed on). Whites and Blacks alike learn to be wary of each other from a very early age. My midget football team was around 35% black and were my friends. But make no mistake about it…. there was always a barrier somewhere in there when you would run across a black friend on the streets with their friends. So yes, sometimes racism is learned at home but not just from white families.

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  16. If a black mouse and a white mouse were placed into a cage, would they come close together as friends or move to opposite corners? I think they become friends because they don’t first stop to look at their own color to notice it is different. This is the true meaning of a colorless society. Skin color has way too much emphasis in this society. As for the cops, I heard a comment the other day that there are bad apples in every group, including cops. The thing is, the police forces know who these bad apples are in their midst, but the systemic problem is that they are protected and never get weeded out, which explains why the problem persists even when the administrators and leaders are also black. Reform must come from within, and from independent review and control of these police forces by outsiders who will eliminate the bad apples before they spoil the entire group.

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    1. Just not sure what true reform will happen. The Democrats have historically been pro union and dependent on union members for money and votes. The Republicans have long been an advocate of being tough on crime and the party of law and order. Again to appeal to a certain segment of voters. Which side will give first? It appears the House Democrats are crafting some legislation to address issues. Local communities are shifting dollars away from police departments and reevaluating the various roles they play and more importantly are best suited for. I haven’t heard much from Republicans on this issue. Why is that? I think collin powell knows.

      Tex

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      1. Man Tex… I know it’s all intertwined, but you’re stirring the pot here.

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        1. Some might say playing with Fire. But it’s a fact that the only republican marching was mitt Romney. Now his dad was a civil rights advocate so there’s a legacy tie, but the also known fact is mitt and the Donald don’t like each other at all and mitt isn’t up for election for another 5 years.

          For anything to happen at the federal level, Democrats and Republicans need to come together. I just don’t see that happening. Maybe we’ll see change sometime next year but don’t hold your breath on anything substantial being passed by Congress and signed by the president this year.

          Tex they call me a realist in sports and politics

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          1. Will Hurd a republican house rep, retiring from Congress this year, marched in Houston the other day. It will take more than two Republicans to pass meaningful legislation at the federal level. That’s why I see local municipalities acting first before you see any national statutes and standards and oversight or even appropriation bills.

            So unfortunately I don’t think these protests are anything more than a feel good moment in time. I hope the energy does lead to change but I’m not drinking the Koolaid just yet.

            The police do know who these bad apples are. But who is policing the police? Well it’s us citizens with cell phones. It shouldn’t be that way.

            Tex

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  17. I’m a strong union man but as president I recognized while leading a local that I had to put honesty at the forefront. I would fight like hell for my brothers but I drew the line when there was blatant dereliction or insubordination of duty. I never gave up on a brother but they had to know…… straighten up or else. This cop is no good and should have been out on his ass a long time ago…

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  18. No question that racism exits in our society. So getting ahead in a racist world makes it very difficult on many minorities. But I’m not sure how much racism has played a part in the early education of these minorities. Some seem to succeed and some don’t I wonder why?

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    1. Such a loaded question. And as privileged white men we may never know. I’m assuming most of us are white. I know for a fact that 100% of the PoV’ers at the tailgates are white.

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      1. ^^ and I will say…… that’s a shame. I did invite Patrick Jones the I to walk over to the Fran and Friends tailgate but that was a no go.

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  19. Here’s a simple exercise. Find a pillow around the house. Place it on the floor. Find three other people and have them stand around you. Now place your knee on the pillow for 8 minutes and 46 seconds.

    I don’t know if that cop was racist but I do know that level of force was unjustified.

    Tex

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  20. @D Tom – I can’t reply to the larger question posed by Mike, but will gladly provide commentary on the athlete student issue.

    As all know, I have been using the term athlete student for many years and Reed and I got into it on one or twelve occasions about my usage of the term. I did this partly because I knew what was happening legally/legislatively in this space before it became news, which is the use of names, images and likeness. It will become more true as time goes by for the majority of institutions.

    Pitt will do the same and will leverage as many corporate sponsors as they can in order to entice athletes to come here. Higher Education is a business. Lets not kid ourselves. Pitt likes to emphasize the “student athlete” because we have been so awful at sport for so many years, that we have no choice. To me, when our coaches earn less than our best faculty members, we will have true student athletes. When a student would rather attend chemistry, than a two a day, I will call them student athletes. You can cherry pick a case or two where a football player had to miss practice for a professional class, but that is a rarity.

    Student athlete went away a long time ago. If your theory is to be adopted that education consists in the students experiencing a series of situations as similar as possible to those he/she will encounter in after-school life, the notion that our college athletics are “educational” falls miserably to pieces.

    Taken from Purdue University: The fact is, that mere playing for compensation is not, in itself, wrong, but the admission to the university of students who are financed because of their athletic prowess and because of their ability to round out winning athletic teams, cannot do otherwise than result in disaster to our educational program and to its standards of scholarship.

    Particular instances in which athletes have been subsidized or otherwise professionalized to the detriment of the intellectual aims of a university will recur to many readers. The presence of a player whose prime interest in college is dependent upon payment for his athletic services, delays and reduces academic instruction to his intellectual level and speed, both in the classroom and in every other phase of college work. It invokes concessions at entrance and at every point at which an academic requirement is set. It leads in the direction of special privilege in tests and examinations, the relaxation of standards of grading in class and in written work, the granting of special opportunities to repair academic standing when it is injured by the close attention to athletic practice that subsidies entail, and much excusing from the obligation to meet academic appointments promptly and sincerely. It disunifies the student body and soon brings other undergraduates to feel that efforts to fulfill the intellectual purposes of the institution avail nothing if men are to be supported merely for the sake of winning games. No other force so completely vitiates the intellectual aims of an institution and each of its members.

    This is happening in front of all of our eyes so let’s call it what it is, athlete students.

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  21. Did you know that Abraham Lincoln was a Republican; George Wallace and Lester Maddox were Democrats and even Strom Thurmond began as the Democratic governor of South Carolina

    I appear to many as a Democrat but am not registered as such … and thought, and still do, that John Kasich was the best candidate of either party in 2016. And personally, I wish Bloomberg would have started his campaign much earlier for this election. I guess the point I’m getting to is that it is pure hell being a moderate these days. Everyone seems to want to take sides … and many don’t even care to look at alternate viewpoints.

    On the day of the Squirrel Hill shootings back in late October 2018, Pitt was beating Duke while I was getting my gall bladder removed at UPMC Passavant. While there, my roommate was a small farm owner from New Galilee which is real close to the Ohio border, northwest of Beaver Falls. He had Fox News on his TV most of the time and wasn’t shy about telling me how much he didn’t care for Lebron James.

    While I was laying there, I began to realize that while he and Lebron grew up and lived less than 70 miles from each other, I couldn’t think of two people more unlike from each other. Their life experiences were totally different …. thus, how could he expect Lebron to think like he did …. (and visa versa.)

    I think most racists don’t allow themselves to identify with blacks and attempt to realize how different and tough it may be if indeed they had a different skin color. And while maybe some blacks wish they were white, they are not interested to hear about problems others may have,

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  22. I’m a registered I don’t give a schitt party member and vote for who I think may be the best person I think could run this country. I think I nailed it last election. Oh Oh, I’m done for good on this topic…..

    Liked by 1 person

  23. yeah tex, the most interesting piece to most all of the return to campus scenarios is that most plans call for no fall break and that in person classes will end at least a week before thanksgiving and the rest of the semester will finish virtually and then the final will be given virtually. That way, students cannot sue the university for failing to provide an in person educational experience.

    Even more interesting is that many universities will not start the winter/spring semester until late january, again, not having a spring break (so students dont travel and bring the yuk back to campus). They will finish in May and poof, graduate.

    Most universities are pushing their legislatures for immunities from lawsuits and I believe several states are close to granting the immunity in the next 2-3 weeks but they are all getting ready to recess. If I had to do all over again, I would have gotten into politics and forced my ideas on people instead of having to argue points here. It’s a tough crowd.

    Like

    1. I just wonder how colleges will cope with the students coming back from winter break after over 30 days away from campus and right in the middle of flu season. I hope they have solid plans and protocols.

      Like

  24. Congrats MM and POVers , you’ve won the prize for Virtue Signaling!! So on Halloween will this site turn orange? And Green and red on Christmas? What a huge load of BS!

    So when the riots tear up Pittsburgh and Oakland and cost our friends their life savings that’s ok? I call BS on all of you.

    Like

    1. In sorry you feel that way Dan. I think it’s entirely possible to support a just cause peacefully. And the fact that I’ve turned this site a different color has nothing to with rioting.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. Actually in light of my response to RKB I owe you an apology Dan. You are entitled to your opinion and I thank you for sharing. Might keep the black motif for a while though, it’s kind of growing on me.

      Like

  25. Joe Biden, who is frequently criticized for his gaffes, recently spoke the politically unwise words that 10-15% of Americans “are just not very good people.” He may be persecuted for that, but it almost certainly is true. And that 10-15% is spread among all races and political affiliations (not sure even as open as he has been on this subject would permit me to add all genders and all religions😉). We will not make solid progress until the remaining majority of us leave our comfort zones and participate in the process.
    We are all well beyond our formative years but that should not mean that we are incapable of being remolded into someone more open minded and willing to consider the possibility that what we have always believed in just may not be the only true answer.

    And Mike said it all when he said that this must be a time for unity. Be open to ideas that are uncomfortable. Be willing to accept that someone else’s opinion might just have some value. And be willing to accept the fact that the 24/7 coverage you listen to on FOX or on CNN May be slanted. I don’t feel ANY if it is “fake news” but I feel ALL of it is “partial news”.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Agree that’s it’s all partial news and all slanted one way or another. Tough to truly figure out the whole picture these days. And yes, this is not comfortable, least if all for me, but I do believe it’s necessary. Maybe nothing comes of it…but maybe not.

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  26. The liberal WOKE stupidity on this site is astounding. Let’s see MM has a friend who owns a business and his clients are racist, so says Mike’s friend. Hmmm …. but he is still in business and doing well and the racists come back. BLM call it systematic racism, “genocide” by the police and ask white protest supporters to take a knee and apologize for how whites have suppressed them, and $375,000 to each African American. Where to begin, I had 2 great great uncles who fought for the Union and died horrible deaths in Andersonville and Florence prison camps – yeah white privilege is what me and my family are about. What the hell does systematic racism mean? seriously we have the Civil Rights Act of 1964 the Voting Rights Act of 1965, Supreme Court ordered desegregation in Brown v. Board of Education and a host of other cases. We have affirmative action in schools and employment. If there is systematic racism maybe, just maybe it is a failure on the part of some local officials who have put making a profit over advancing programs to really help eg Al Sharpton who breeds hate (remember how he went after Jewish people in NY) and Jessie Jackson (remember he smeared blood from MLK Jr on himself to advance – MLK Jr was a childhood hero of mine). There are racists in all walks of life and in all races. That brings me to the next point. IN the 50’s and 60″s we fought to put an end to many southerners who treats blacks as people who should bow before them eg Bull Connor. Can anybody remember who he is – younsters pick up a book. Now to genocide – according to the Washington Post 30 unarmed people were killed by police last year; 20 white and 10 black. Of the 10 black 2 police are being prosecuted for murder; 5 cases involved the civilian charging the police. The problem with statistics is that they leave out much – lies, damn lies and statistics. So 1 in 35 million unarmed African Americans were killed by police in 2019 according to the washington post. That is genocide as per BLM? If so it would make a mockery of real genocide such as the holocast and Mao murdering 50 million Chiinese.
    I supported the struggle for racial equality in the 60s and 70s, I need not list how here but I did. I will never as BLM did to white supporters at protests have them bow on their knees and apologize for white racism and privilege. I came from a very very poor background, as listed above my family and ancestors have fought real racism. I will take no knee and apologize for the past for imagined injustice based on all the above; nor would I ever expect other races to do to me. Racism is racism whether the racist in in a minority or majority. At Pitt where i obtained 2 degrees in political science I was taught to rely on empirical data.. You WOKE, snowflake, social justice warriors have no data to support your claims. Now when confronted with a lack of data it is time to call me out as a racist, xenophobe, sexist.. just a whole basket of deplorables. HAIL TO PITT.
    ps 18 people were murdered in Chicago this past weekend, not by the police. Defund the police as called for by BLM – you all are riding the crazy train. See you when we get back to talking football and Pitt activities.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Get it out RKB…get it all out. No wrong answers here. (Except for far right or far left militant extremists, neither of which will tolerated). H2p and I appreciate your passion.

      Liked by 1 person

  27. I have a different view of college athletes, especially FB and BB, that most do want to get a degree out of the college experience. They know that only 1% or so will ever get a professional paycheck, and that they are only one injury away from their career being over. What better insurance policy than getting a college degree on someone else’s dime? If the NFL cared about all these players they would develop a minor league for kids who don’t want college or for college players who still want the chance. But why should they?

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  28. just to be clear dahn …. the protests in Pgh over the last several days have been peaceful. And film footage show that any damages of the previous weekend were caused (mostly if not all) by radical whites. In fact, there was a picture where a white kid attacked a PG photographer and a black lady got in between them.

    Now these protests will eventually end, as will the Covid scare …. and sadly the right will continue to follow their news sources, and the left will do the very same ….. and each side will continue to ridicule the other side for things that their own side are guilty of. And of course, neither side will even think of the possibility that their side can possibly be wrong every once in a while

    Liked by 2 people

  29. Yeah, let’s get out of here.

    PITT is sitting on a POSSIBLE great season. I’d rather talk about how horrible a coach Narduzzi is and what a lousy AD Heather is no matter how absurd those thoughts are. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  30. Long ago and in a land far, far away they followed a different path.

    I was in London on the day Ohio National Guard soldiers shot students on the
    campus of Kent State University. I was on an embassy row where the US Embassy and those of other nations occupied very large houses. A group of 10,000 protesters were marching toward the embassy carrying banners, coffins and such. Two lines of Bobbies formed in the street to keep the protesters from reaching our embassy. The protesters halted about 50 feet from the lines and they began hurling bottles, rocks and other objects at the Bobbies. No response. The mob surged and the lines of Bobbies locked arms and mostly kept the surge back. Where their lines were broken, Bobbies on horses went to the breech. Those horsemen carried long trunchons but the horsies did most to control things.

    This went on for more than an hour: surges; bottles; rocks; Bobbies with locked arms; and horsies as needed. The mob never made it to the embassy but they did manage to break every window on the front of the building. Through most of the demonstration a Bobby sargent stood arms folded, on the porch roof of the building observing the goings on. He was a target. Bottles crashed around him and shattered against the bricks of the building. The man had nerves of steel. When he left the roof, he turned his back on the mob and walked to one of the hugh windows. The glassless window frame was flanked by two swinging storm windows which were also shattered. He climbed in through the window. Bottles and whatnots were still being flung. I felt relieved that he was out of danger. Ten seconds passed and the sargent appeared in the window again. He climbed out onto the roof and calmly pulled each of the paneless storm windows in toward the center of the opening. He climbed back into the embassy, closing the storm windows and latching them in place.

    Some are now saying that it is not the bad apples, it is the bad tree. I agree with this. A tree with non-threatening, locked-armed Bobbies might not grow here. I did respect those SOB’s. Expecting a people to respect theintimidation of billy clubs, rubber bullets, gas, and tasers is foolish. You fear that, you don’t respect it. This is just a true story. My only purpose is to illustrate that there are different ways

    Liked by 3 people

  31. This is important because kids these days see it as such. And minority kids in particular who just happen to comprise the majority of college sports programs. It’s something that can’t be ignored. It’s something that needs to bring about real change. The protests won’t stop. Local communities are beginning to demilitarize the police. A police department doesn’t need tanks or other high tech military weapons. There is a lot a police department does that really isn’t their role to protect citizens. If anything this event will force communities to rethink the role of police and possibly reorganize, reassign, retrain and remove the bad apples. Again, I don’t think you’ll see federal legislation until next year. Not sure what the feds could do anyone. Police is local just like schools. Maybe some national standards around oversight and training.

    Liked by 1 person

  32. Racism is not a difference of opinion. You cannot agree to disagree. In order to move past racism, there has to be empathy. You cannot have this conversation with folks that lack empathy … You’ll end up with empirical data that tells the story that they want their data to tell.

    Yes, more white people have been killed by the police this year than black folks. How many of them were killed in routine stops by having the life choked out of them for 8 minutes and 45 seconds while onlookers were warning the cop that he was going to choke the life out of the person if he didn’t lift up his knee. How many were reduced to calling for their mom in their dying breaths only to be ignored? How many were videotaped because onlookers just knew something was wrong and that they would need evidence to support what they saw?

    I am not a liberal, either. Had Warren or Sanders been the nominee I would have sat out the election. Nor am I a Biden fan but at least I know he’s only, probably, 4 years.

    Right is right.

    I grew up on the wrong side of the tracks, too. My dad was a firefighter in Erie. I’m the oldest of 6 kids with a 12 year age gap between me and the youngest. My mom was a stay at home mom. My dad never made more than $35K while I lived at home. He was a functioning alcoholic who, when he wasn’t at the firehouse, was at the local pub or one of seemingly 10 varying clubs that he was a member too. I lived in, and my parents still live in, a small 3 bedroom row house. That’s 8 people and 2 dogs and a cat in that f’ing place. The neighborhood was predominantly white but not completely white.

    My schools were more diverse than my neighborhood, however. My Middle School, Gridley, was particularly rough. A typical inner city rust belt school. That’s where I first realized that skin color changed things. It was HomeEc of all classes. I was causing trouble in the class and cracking jokes. The teacher pulled me aside and told me that she would accept an apology and “understood” because I was sitting at a table with a bunch of black kids, and she could just tell that they were a bunch of troublemakers. I assured her that they were not the troublemakers but I did apologize. Another teacher, my English teacher the following year who would eventually become a principal at a newly created magnet school, overheard the discussion and became irate at me for defending “them”. I remember saying that I wasn’t defending anyone, I was taking responsibility for my actions like my mom taught me to do. I may have said my grandfather, but whatever. Her anger made me angry and defensive. I’m getting mad just thinking about it. Those teachers saw what they wanted to see. I got D’s all year the following year in that English teacher’s class. The only D’s of my entire school career … until college, anyways, but that’s another story. She never forgave me for not ratting on a bunch of kids who didn’t do anything except be a different skin color than her. Later, she accused me of intentionally dropping pudding from the top of a stairwell to get me suspended. Didn’t work. Thankfully, I had a distant relative that was a teacher at the school and believed me and blocked it. My HomeEc teacher just ignored me and moved me to a new table where I’m sure I continued cracking jokes.

    6th grade. 11 years old. Fall of 1986. That’s when I realized that I had privilege even tho I didn’t come from privilege. Its also when I realized that if I didn’t follow a certain narrative, my life could be made harder too. Two important lessons that I’m glad I learned at a young age.

    Change is good. It often means progress. There will always be people where change hurts them, or they perceive it will hurt them … and they will fight it … and they will fear monger … or call you names … or try to label you … anything that they can do to discredit you to prevent progress.

    H2P … and, yes, I fully understand the irony of my avatar potentially being racial propagation

    Liked by 5 people

  33. Good one Tossing. Nice of you to share your background. I found it interesting and honest. Our experiences define us. And all of ours are different.

    I’m glad pitt coaches released statements. I think all were well done. Racism won’t end overnight. It will always be a part of this world. Police reform will take time and every community will do things differently

    From a fan perspective, it’s a good thing to support Pitts minority players. To listen and do our best to understand racism and police profiling and brutality. Hopefully at the very least we reflect on our own prejudices and biases and strive to do better. The country is too divided as is.

    Tex

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  34. Maybe a good post to wrap this thread up is to make note of the POV of the Pitt POV ….

    My best guess is that the make-up of posters here are almost all white males with a college education, and while maybe some were born poor, most likely make (or made) more than average income. And most, if not all, has not faced any racial bias but instead possibly knows of friends / co-workers who have.

    I’m not going to make any assertions about the validity or reliability of the opinions here …. this is simply a Pitt sports blog and anyone is welcome to join.

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  35. When Kevin Stallings was fired, I remember hoping that Pitt would hire a black head coach. It was for selfish reasons. I figured the vast majority of the good players are black and who could better relate to them and their parents in their living rooms than a black man. I wasn’t basketball-smart enough to be aware of Jeff Capel at the time; the best available young black candidate I could come up with to root for Pitt to hire was Earl Grant. And I must admit that when I heard that Jeff Capel was hired, I had no clue who he was — but I was surprised and delighted when I Googled him to see he was a black man…

    Now, I must say that I’m really proud of the way Jeff Capel represents Pitt. Especially in his comments on how we all need to work together to address problems of racism.

    Hail to Pitt.

    Liked by 2 people

  36. Been watching race riots for over sixty years now, little has changed. No matter what the negro Americans are given it is never enough. As soon as these most recent riots stop, look for a major push for REPARATIONS.

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    1. To think this round could all have been avoided if the man who kneeled in a black person’s neck has simply been arrested and charged before a police station burnt down…

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    1. at least “things” can and do change in this great nation….not so much in Russia, Communist China, North Korea, Venezuala and Cuba…

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hail yea my brother. How we get there isn’t always pretty but at least the people – ALL walks of people – have a voice

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  37. It’s been global pandemic, global recession, the shut down of most sports, race riots/protests. Too much for my mind to handle. My head would surely blow off if Narduzzi won 10 games this year.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Tex, I call it sensory over-load….just came back from a 4-day stay at the Indiana Hilton Garden Inn next to the IUP basketball arena…I can report things are just starting to open up and get back to normal in your hometown….

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      1. Normal would mean shooting off guns, fishing, boating, cookouts, drinking and watching the coeds sunbathe on the lawn. I’m glad we’re getting back to normal.

        Tex

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        1. Tex, you just described the rest of the week for JoeL, Lastrow and Richman who are heading to a summit meeting at my bunker on the OBX..we will BS much and solve all the world’s problems that they don’t make medicine for…

          Would like to jump into the BLM conversation and lend my 2cents FWIW- wrote a very long post the other night and put my heart and thoughts into it but it did not post so I just said heck with it….a couple of you know that I have been involved in “Kairos” prison ministry and have spent time in maximum security prisons trying to take the light of Christ/God to men. Hopefully, some are changed and I can bear witness lives have been changed. I know a former inmate who occasionally sits with me at church…one thing I want to pass on from one of our Kairos week-end that I would like to share…During one of our breaks during the morning session on the 2nd or 3rd day one of the team clergy members who was also a former NC state Representative and a black man came over to me and asked ” Bernie, do you know how the state plans for future prison beds?” I shook by head no…He proceeded to tell me the state looks at a 3rd grade reading score and the number of boys without a fahter living in the house ! They know if a child struggles they will probably not finish school and without a father or fatherly figure they learn from the streets…if what he told me was factual and I had no reason to doubt him then why aren’t we hearing about this and dealing with the primary tumor (breakdown of the family). Probably because one would be labeled a racist simply for speaking the truth…so we continually treat the metastasis…the disease goes…. Did anyone see the love of God or Christ over the past couple of weeks in those horrendous TV footage…I didn’t…God has been kicked out of government, schools…what’s next get rid of the flag and the National Anthem…We are witnessing a tangled web of hate, anarchy, politacal postioning and political agenda’s…All lives matter- we were made in His image. I believe that with all my heart…Antifa and BLM are political movements in my opinion. What I fear most is the world my grand-kids will grow up in…I think we may be headed something much bigger than civil unrest….
          Keep praying and show your light to the world.

          Liked by 3 people

          1. Welp and now we’ve crossed the line into religion, but yes all intertwined. Remember to keep the discussion civil guys. You’ve been doing a great job so far. Would that the voice of God been whispered into the ear of the man kneeling on Poor George Floyd’s neck, we’d still be talking about football and pandemics. God does not discriminate but unfortunately some of his creations do. Appreciate you sharing Big B.

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      2. Yes BigB, our sympathies and condolences to JeanieB, her entire family and yourself. Such a sad story.

        ike and Angie

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  38. TX – Man, it looks like they have the defense for a top 15 team and the offense of a top 75 team. Haha. I have no idea where this team will land.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. we are very familiar with 40th place finishes…probably where our recruiting will end up if we don’t land a couple of 4 stars…….

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  39. I’m banking on Pitt reaching 10 wins and taking the Coastal through other teams forfeiting due to covid sickness. I’ll take those wins.

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  40. I’ve said it before and I will say it again, I would much rather PITT to be picked to finish 6th than 1st but I just don’t understand the lack of respect with this particular team? This team is poised to make some noise!

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  41. the whole video might be worth watching but at least the last few minutes does it for me

    MM, thanks for the thread and please tell me your response to grizzly1 was what i think it was – sarcasm

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  42. i recommend from about minute 30 onward, my attempt to “copy video URL at current time” did not work it seems

    and MM, I mean your 11:10 am reply

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    1. Sarcastic, but also a metaphor. If this spark didn’t set off the tinder pile, another one would have.

      Liked by 1 person

  43. Part of the problem is history and the poor job US schooling does of teaching it. We study the Civil War way too much and Reconstruction not enough because the good guys won the Civil War, but the bad guys won Reconstruction.

    This is a hefty read but helps explain why we are where we are with race …

    Like

  44. I read a lot of white guilt here. I truly wish the Black movement would admit some Blacks do commit crimes. The very high % of Blacks in prison is not the results of racism no matter how you spin it.
    Why are we in this mess? I don’t have the answers as do any of you. Maybe Johnson’s Great Society had something to do with it? Do overly aggressive Black leaders, such as AL Sharpton, stir the pot too much? Reparations? Does the development of the separate Black culture lead to greater division? Most minorities want to assimilate/blend into the American society. Many immigrant minorities end up doing well. Look at the strives made by the Asian Indians in this Country.

    White privilege? Sorry don’t buy it. Nor do I buy systematic racism. Media TV and Sports are dominated by Blacks. If you are good at something, or they want/need you, you will succeed in a capitalist society/economy.

    Prejudice of cause does exist. Some Whites hate Blacks and some Blacks hate Whites. Of course, the dislike is not restricted to just the two groups. We can include Jews, Catholics, Indians, Asians and so on.

    I was born and raised in the Fort Greene Neighborhood of Brooklyn. Transferred out of Florida State University after my freshman year in 1961. It was a segregated school back then. It was something I had never seen growing up in Brooklyn, Catholic, and with immigrant parents. I couldn’t stomach it. That period of history was the start of race equally in America.

    Now the real issue is economic equally. Ultimately that needs to come from within the person the social group.

    Demonstrations are okay. Looting, destruction in NYC was bad. Murder rate more than doubled for the week in the City.

    Liked by 2 people

  45. ^^ BigB, TT and REL, this is where the truth lays. It’s why I retreated from this discussion. Seems to me that we are avoiding the real reasons why we are having this discussion and this article in the first place. BUT! It’s not OK to speak our minds right now truthfully or we would be called insensitive and racist. Things do need to change but lets start in our own homes. All of our homes from all sides of the track.

    Liked by 2 people

  46. Thanks JoeL, can’t read the whole article but I think I get the gist? My problem is when I hear the term thug it has zero color attached to it. If they want everyone to be politically correct fine by me. I tend to mind my own business unless my nest is disturbed. Then I can become a mad hornet. It’s good to live on the island known as Latrobe. I’ve known many people I considered thugs and they were all white. What in the hell is this country and world coming to? Speaking of country I might have to move further on up. The mountains are right up the road from me where the water tastes like wine.

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  47. I also can’t read it but it’s my understanding that the word Thugs is a no-no in the NBA …. which is ironic since when I think of Thug and the NBA, the very first person I think of is Bill Laimbeer

    Liked by 1 person

  48. anyone else bothered reading here with the black background

    i hope my eyeballs aren’t racist

    i lasted on that FB “dark mode” choice of display for only about a minute for the same reason

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    1. Yes I find the black background difficult and while it was a eye-catcher, I got the point and am hoping for an easier to read background.

      Perhaps a gray background – halfway between black and white – and reflective of many of the posters here (haha).

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  49. Is one horrific murder by a racist and sadistic police officer worth the lives of 17 people taken by the “peaceful protestors”?
    https://fox6now.com/2020/06/08/deadly-unrest-here-are-the-people-who-have-died-amid-george-floyd-protests-across-us/

    BLM funded by the evil, cold hearted hedge fund manager who once tried to crash the English economy, former communist, though raised Jewish in Hungary during the Nazi area he now wishes that Israel be destroyed ie he is a blatant racist who uses his ill gotten billions to foment unrest worldwide. He purchased the Democrat Party to stave it from bankruptcy stating later “I bought it and I own it” Heck you want sourcing look it up on the fount of all knowledge.
    I’m out of here for a few weeks for M&M’s blatant disregard for his no politics rule just so he can put forth his own pollitical theory. Anyone notice he has changed the internet icon to three raised fists, turning the POV into his own personal political platform, M&M you have done an excellent job in replace of the person who will constantly tell you how great he is but you have also undermined the POV position that there will be no politics on this site. Inconsistency is the foundation of hypocrisy. You have become the KING of hypocrisy. More importantly when we move back to what this site was created for, You ought to work for Instagram, Facebook etc censorship.
    you have undermined your the moral underpinnings of any deletion of posts as “political”. No reader will ever be able to trust that you are allowing posts that agree with your politics and striking those that are not, (That said I wish you had kept the deletion of that obnoxious first post).
    HAIL TO PITT.

    Like

    1. I’m sorry you feel that way RKB. I’m simply honoring the Pitt Player’s wishes. After all, they are the reason the POV exists. You don’t have to agree with their stance. I happen to. And I’m perfectly happy if you never read or comment on this blog again. But of course you are welcome to, even though you have broken the gentlemen’s rules of civility, which everybody but you is adhering to, whether they agree with the players or not.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. You may want to lay off the cable news for a while, too, while you’re at it … how many Facebook posts have you had removed? 🤣🤣🤣

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    3. Good Lord, a believer in the Soros conspiracy nonsense. Right here on the POV. Goes to show living inside the right-wing news bubble can lay waste to a Pitt education. Alas.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Haha. No. But thanks for asking. You guys have all seemed to do plenty of reading and writing over the last few days…black background or not.

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  50. The year was 1968. The place was a city league high school in Pittsburgh. The basketball team was 90 per cent black and the football team was approximately 70 per cent black. In those days the football teams in the city league got very few Div 1 scholarships.

    In his senior year, a big, rough and tough white kid decided to play football. He was an exceptional player, but by no means the best on the team. He only played that one year of high school football. We had two black kids that coach said could play at the major college level. (Coach played in the NFL for three years, so he should have known what it takes to play college ball). One of the black kids was also a tremendous basketball player (won many city league honors in an era that the city was loaded with talent that did get many Div 1 scholarships).

    I remember one day at football practice where the rough and tough white kid went head to head with the exceptional black player. I remember coach telling the white kid he couldn’t move the black kid off of the line.

    When it came time for scholarships to college, the white kid got offers to many Div 1 schools. The black kid had no offers. There was much outrage about racism and favoritism. Coach said white kid had good grades and potential while black kid did not have the grades to get into a program. I believed coach and felt all of the racism complaints were hogwash.

    Fast forward twenty years and white person had a very successful college and pro career and has a great life. Black kid was dead from a drug overdose. I have wondered what would have happened if he had been given more of a chance.

    Sometimes racism can be very subtle.

    Liked by 1 person

  51. I have greatly appreciated everyones contributions to this thread. There isn’t a more eloquent group of posters ANYWHERE. My thoughts I hope aren’t especially political or racially motivated. I really hope that George Floyd’s unnecessary death is the last straw in bringing about police/law enforcement reform. I will bet that all of us can think of someone currently or in the past who was employed in law enforcement and really shouldn’t have been. Although the clear majority of those who are involved in law enforcement choose that profession to serve and protect, there has always been a subset of bad people who choose the field to do bad things behind the protection of the badge. Unfortunately, the majority are afraid to say/do something, so their abuses continue year after year. (The cop kneeling on Mr. Floyd’s neck had had 17 complaints) There needs to be a zero tolerance policy against these bad actors. One strike and they are out. I believe greater screening of those who want to be in the police is needed, with more training (and better pay for this thankless work).
    On a happier note, have a great trip Richman, Lastrow, JoeL, and Bernie. Look forward to hearing the stories from the trip when you return.

    Liked by 4 people

  52. Nobody asked me, but I’m sympathetic to the cause of reducing police brutality and reforming big city (and not so big) police departments. I am, however, disgusted by the looting, violence, and general lawlessness that has accompanied these protests. If you want change, be serious. Be a citizen who has rights deserving of protection, and the first step to doing that is respecting the rights of others to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects. Otherwise, piss off.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I have a shotgun being delivered tomorrow. Think it’s a good time to re-arm myself. Make sure you knock before entering. I’m ready for some PITT football!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Burning down half of Minneapolis is not going to solve those problems; if anything, it’s likely to make them worse.

        Like

        1. Can’t argue that point. However it’s fair to point out that the policeman who killed the (unarmed) Young – after he had been subdued – was not even arrested or charged until his police station was torched. Two wrongs absolutely do not make a right and the police station should NOT have been burned down, but that cop should have been arrested as soon as that video was released. I think a lot of people are missing that point.

          Like

        2. The vast majority of protests have been peaceful. Those looting and burning are young white kids predominately who are racists, facists, natzis and anti government anarchists.

          Protestors are not shooting rubber bullets, usingcsound cannons, flash grenades, low flying apaches, tear gasing, pushing down, pepper spraying, and beating

          Those people would be the cops and military police.

          Like

  53. It appears to me that the basic solution to the problem requires a change of heart. The latest killings are a symptom of the disease, not the disease itself. Demonstrations, threats ( “No Justice, No Peace), looting and destruction, neutering police forces are not the way to win peoples’ hearts. Congress’ laws over the past hundred fifty years have done nothing to win people’s hearts – what makes anyone think they can “negotiate” to change hearts?

    I think there is one way to accomplish a national healing of the heart. Bernie touched on it. I can’t be specific on this blog, for fear of being ruled “out of bounds”. It is not an over night fix. It’ll probably take generations to accomplish. I’ll let ya’ll figure it out

    Liked by 2 people

  54. Thug is complicated. Unfortunately, recently it has become “code” for the N word with younger folks. I also think Bill Lambeir or hockey. Someone like Duzz, who is around young people should have picked this up a while ago. He has several black coaches on the staff who could have addressed it with him, too. Phil Jackson ran into a similar problem a few years ago mentioning Lebron’s posse. I understand why Lebron took offense to it but my dad is the same age and calls groups of people a posse, with no racial bias. Probably from being a western fan. Beilein with Cavs made it worse for himself by saying he meant to say slugs … who says slugs? Just apologize. Smh.

    Some of these terms really are just a coach not knowing better … but at the same time a good coach should probably be able to pick up some of the lingo and connotations. The big thing, good or bad, is people don’t like to be labeled so stop labeling folks. I tend to agree it can be overkill but we all should probably adapt to the new normal or be marginalized and mislabeled ourselves … weird right?

    The Athletic article was interesting … it painted Duzz as afraid and Heather as not wanting to rock the boat. For all the family talk, Duzz seemed oblivious. It also made him seem human. Ian Troost talked about how even though Duzz didn’t support his kneeling he was able to squash some bullying that came from the kneeling. He was still separated right from wrong. I could see recruits and parents seeing a racially insensitive coach who is trying to be better. He did not come across as racist IMO.

    Like

  55. Picked 6th by 24/7 probably due to the QB. He has played a lot, but there is nothing in his history that suggests he will have success. The OL, with returning starters, doesn’t mean the returning starters are better than their opponents. It just means they are returning starters.

    That is why I chuckle when so many jumped on all of our 2 stars that were major contributors to the team the other day. The 2 stars may be major contributors, because we don’t have 4 stars. The overperforming 2 and 3 stars get you mediocrity. When you are putting two and three stars out there, you would expect a two and three star to contribute mightily because they have to.

    Many will focus on the 2 star Patrick Jones and get all excited about him only being a 2 star and look how he is going to get drafted. I say, great for him. PAris Ford, Damar Hamlin, Twyman, all highly rated and they will all get drafted. The odds are better with the 5.6’s and up.

    Sorry I can’t join the discussion on the other topic. My take is much different and one you haven’t heard. Its emotionless. No feelings. Once you take emotion and feelings out of a conversation, clarity will be gained.

    I did get confused when perusing the comments earlier. Not sure who the minorities are when it comes to the team composition and who we should support. Who looks at race other than racists?

    Like

    1. sorry you can’t join the discussion on the other topic?
      why bother mentioning your take at all then?
      guess we will be left to wade about lost in the fog

      Liked by 1 person

  56. I’m glad Narduzzi listened, understood and made a change. He gained the respect of his players, United the locker room and the team is stronger as a result.

    Now what do we think of the NCAA and universities that make billions off the black athlete.

    What do we make of the lack of minority coaches in football or as athletic directors. You can’t tell me there isn’t overt and subtle racism. The old white rich men are doing whatever they can to preserve their power. To me that’s institutional racism.

    What do we make of fans who spend the coin for entertainment but don’t listen, don’t want to understand and don’t want to change?

    Tex

    Like

  57. Interesting that we on this forum can’t reach agreement on why Pitt can’t win 10 or 11 games on a regular basis or why Pitt can’t recruit more 4 and 5 star players but we will take on a topic that is at least 10 times more complex. Oh well, here are my 2 cents.

    Prejudice and discrimination have been with us since the beginning of time and will be here at the end of time. It changes with time as to who is the aggrieved party. It can be associated with race, ethnicity, gender, religion, sexual orientation, affluence (caste system), handicap, you name it.

    In my youth it was Italians, Irish, and Poles who were discriminated against in employment, housing, even social contact. “NO, we will not allow you to marry a (fill in the blank)“. They even each had their own pejorative nickname. We grew up being told a Catholic could never be President of the U.S. They Kennedy came along. How many people in the entertainment industry changed their last name to hide the fact that they were Jewish so that they might have a chance to success in that “woke” industry?

    From what I see, most, if not all, of those particular prejudices are now gone. How did that happen? Is it just a matter of generations dying off and being replaced with others? I don’t know. But I do know how it didn’t happen. It was not erased with violence, anarchy, in-your-face anger, or Government mandate. As Savannahpanther noted earlier, it seems to only happen when hearts and minds are won over. And the actions we are watching, in my opinion, do exactly the opposite. Sort of like plopping a Section 8 Government housing unit in the middle of a subdivision of million dollar houses. None of the previous residents will be heard saying, “Sure I instantly lost $750K of net worth but I gained a first-hand knowledge of how people on welfare live. So it’s all good.”

    I suspect this current situation will fade away without much meaningful improvement. But only because of the way it is being conducted.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Farmers, I would have completely agreed with you 20 years or so ago. However, I’m not so sure anymore. I think things have changed with social media / blogs, 24/7 news, etc … Alternate views (from all sides) are much easier to access and make impressions on people who otherwise would not be exposed to such,.

      However, even before this …. I think it says a lot that 100 years after the Civil War, legislation like the Civil Rights Act had to be enacted. Racism will always be there, and though it is waning over the years …. it is certainly not a straight declining line

      Like

  58. If black athletes don’t like coach using the word thug, then he shouldn’t use it. Words and meanings change over time. Thug is now considered a racially insensitive word by minorities. As coach, once he listened and understood, it was easy for him to make a change and refrain from using the word.

    I used to use the word retard. I don’t anymore because it’s insensitive and there are more effective vocabulary words out there.

    I may want to reconsider using the phrase meatballs for brains since it may come across wrong as in me being biased against Italians despite my Sicilian wife and love of meatball recipes. But that would be a bridge too far.

    🤠

    Like

  59. Interesting that Roger Goodell came out with an apology so maybe peaceful protests do cause begrudging change. Racists want to point to the opportunistic criminal behavior or political opportunists, yes white nationalists who infiltrate to start their race war.

    When cities win sports championships, looting, burning cars and other opportunistic criminal behavior takes place that has nothing to do with people wanting to celebrate.

    Women had to take to the streets to gain their right to vote. Peaceful protest is the right of every American. It is in the first amendment. It is called freedom. It makes us different from the Russians or Chinese.

    In Wisconsin, when armed white men rushed the statehouse dressed like military to protest covid 19 measures, no one brought out the billy clubs or pepper spray, so don’t tell me there is no white privilege or systematic racism. If those were black men, there would have been hell to pay and definite blood shed

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The armed white men you refer to didn’t loot and riot. The peacefully protested as they should be aloud to do. Just like BLM should be.
      No one is against peaceful protests, everyone should be against looting and rioting.

      That is not white priviledge. That is common sense.

      Liked by 1 person

        1. I sm sure that has unfortunately happened. Some of the instances I saw where protestors ignoring many warnings to disperse or move that were given by police trying to protect an area/building after previous vandalism.

          Like

  60. The Black experience was far different than those other groups that Farmer mentions. 200 years of slavery, 100 years of segregation, and the last 50 years of slow progress towards economic equality.

    Like

  61. Some cops get a power trip and are gung ho on escalation. And it’s easy for cops to get away with abuse and even murder. And easier to commit that abuse and brutality on the poor or minorities. That’s why people are marching globally. Police having far too much power, protecting themselves, not being held accountable and targeting certain groups. The rest of the world has these same issues with policing forces although I would argue that America’s is the most severe among free countries. So hopefully something good comes out of this. That’s what the Pitt players are hoping for as well.

    Looks like Pitt will have the entire south side for themselves. Steelers plan on practicing at Heinz given the more room for social distancing. So where does that leave Pitt?

    Tex

    Like

    1. What a lot of ppl forget is that this protest started to protest excessive force against UNARMED ppl. Armed criminals are an entirely different story altogether.

      Police work is hard and dangerous. But using excessive force on unarmed suspects is wrong. That should be pretty cut and dried, IMO.

      Liked by 2 people

  62. Or, Roger Goodell could be chasing the money. The organization he runs has taken a huge financial and reputational hit and will continue in that vein. As I read the top of the thread, it reads “your voice matters”. Let’s be honest. Your voice only matters if you say what other people want you to say. We are in a sheep culture.

    As an illustration, I made a decision not to post on the topic and tvax tried to shame me for doing it. There was no understanding of my point of view or my decision not to address the topic. Did you ever think about just RESPECTING my decision to not comment tvax? If so, I missed that sentence. That’s the problem of all of this in a nutshell. No RESPECT. The internet has given everyone an emotional and oft time a reactionary voice and the velocity of voice travels and collects momentum at such speed that thoughtful discussion or discourse cannot occur. I take emotion out of most all I do.

    RKB may be a bit correct on this and farmers is too when he stated that we can’t agree on how to get Pitt to 10 wins so why would the pov think as a collective, we could figure this situation out. A lack of respect and honest discourse keeps everything the same. That is Pitt athletics for 40 years and politicians on both sides of the fence for the last 75 years, yet everyone gets a free pass.

    It is no secret that the Upitt’s, the Commander, Tex and Don’t drive, and many other’s have left because there really is no other side to the mob mentality coin. There is no respect for a different opinion. It’s an excuse making love fest celebrating mediocrity for 40 years. We can’t get through a topic without 5 songs attached (might be exaggerating) because most all regular posters say the same thing time after time. Next year is our year and recruiting is great and it’s too cold and there are too many barriers to competition etc. Personally, I do think this football year Pitt does better than the pundits predict. Basketball too. But that doesn’t mean things can’t be better. Unfortunately, we will never get better without respecting the other side of the coin and actually embracing it and every once in awhile accepting that someone has a better idea than their own. Drop mic!

    Like

    1. Just a slight correction Huff the Third, Tex has never left the POV and Upitt (Mark my buddy) has started back up again. I also take umbrage that the “other sides” opinion weren’t taken into consideration. It’s called debating when disagreeing. Tex has no problem with someone disagreeing with him. << I think he likes it. 🙂

      Like

      1. I do like honest debate. I do my best to state opinion versus fact. And when stating something I try my best to back up with data and a source. I’m not always perfect on this but I don’t just make things up.

        I do have strong and sometimes controversial opinions. I can take what I dish. But huff does have a point. Some people just don’t bother to even listen and automatically ignore certain points of view.

        I may not be able to convince most on here about a MPC or that Heather isn’t really as good as you think, but it won’t stop me from trying. But some posters don’t have my skin or backbone. I developed mine during those god awful 90’s. Some people didn’t have that luxury. I’m actually a better fan as a result but I know many would laugh at that comment. That’s because you never took the time to actually listen. That’s all pitt players are asking for as well.

        Tex

        Like

        1. Tex you convinced me about an MPC it’s just that I’m even more convinced that it won’t happen. As far as Heather goes, I really can’t see where she has failed in any way. I had the same disdain for steve so I get it if you don’t like her she will never please you in any way.

          Like

          1. Ike
            Name me five good things heather has done

            To me it’s the following
            Trying to instill excellence across all programs. Accountability. Focus on winning breeds success. She learned that from Ohio state

            Good graduation rates, gpas, community service and running clean programs. I would expect nothing less from her given compliance is her forte. Although two probations happened under her watch albeit minor.

            Hiring Capel. I truly think she hit a home run there but time will tell.

            Changing the colors to the blue and gold I remember. It was a no brainer and fans demanded it. Don’t care if anyone thinks the yellow isn’t brown or mustard enough. Colors pop on tv. That’s all that matters.

            The design of the pitt studios and renovating the soccer field, updating Fitzgerald and switching the court at the Pete. All obvious needs but she executed.

            Free fantas. I luv me a good pop and the orange flavor is my favorite for staying past that awful sweet Caroline garbage song.

            Now I can name you at least 20 more meaningful metrics where she has failed. Her yellow blouse is just to distract you Ike.

            I didn’t like cornhole 2. But I don’t see how heather is a significant improvement.

            Tex who thinks Louis riddick will make a good AD

            Like

            1. Former Pitt football player

              Former NFL exec

              Media guru

              Passionate about pitt

              Extremely intelligent and charismatic.

              Large social network

              Black guy. Black guy. Color does matter in sports. Because 95 percent of white guys who have posted, have proven that.

              Tex

              Like

        1. Yeah, Emel is still around a Pover did talk to him by phone. Conversation was private so I don’t want to get too deep into it. I’ll just say he may have had a medical setback. Hopefully he comes around and starts commenting again someday.

          Liked by 2 people

    2. Huff – been reading your posts for years. There are usually some good nuggets to digest and think about.

      That said, you speak of “give and take” while criticizing others differing views with outlandiish desciptiions such as “mob mentality”. Your posts invite discussion and debate, but when that happens, you announce that you are going to other sites where you are able to find what you seek. So what if someone posts music video links….so what? Move past them if you don’t like them. Its not hard.

      And for that you believe a mic drop is appropriate?… that’s quite a bit of undeserved braggadocio.

      JoeL who like Tex loves true give and take

      Liked by 3 people

  63. I’ll just say it, a lot of the racism is self-induced. You walk around with your pants hanging down the back of your legs and singing songs like “it was a good day I didn’t have to use my AK” and so on. Italians were looked down upon but they were willing to work or at least organize. 😉 I respect everyone one I meet for the first time of all colors and creed. Don’t really trust them until they prove their-selves and I reserve the right to stop respecting them on merit. We are skirting around real issues here imo ike

    Like

    1. And to be clear – the real issue here is the excessive use of force against unarmed suspects. Regardless of race creed or color. However it seems (and also the data indicates) that most cases of excessive use of force against UNARMED ppl happens to black ppl.

      Liked by 1 person

  64. Weekend at Bernies kicking off tonight…met Bernie last night and we go to a bakery this morning.
    Of course he knows everyone in the place and all the girls come out from behind the counter to give him hugs.
    As two of his buddies are leaving they each stop to say “if you’re hanging with this guy be careful…and the second guy says ‘and dont get shot”
    Richman and JoeL coming tonight…what could go wrong? 😎

    Liked by 6 people

    1. Consider the source. This probably crosses the line.

      Reasoning: Extreme Right, Propaganda, Hate Group

      Notes: Founded on February 5, 2007, Taki’s Magazine is an extreme right wing online magazine of politics and culture published by journalist Taki Theodoracopulos. According to a Guardian article entitled “The way of the Jackal”, Taki Theodoracopulos has racist views.

      Taki’s Magazine proclaims on its about page: “Our only ideology is to be against the junk culture foisted upon us by Hollywood and the mainstream media, and mirages of a new world order.” Taki’s Magazine’s former Executive Editor was Richard Spencer, who is an American white supremacist that coined the term Alternative Right. Gavin McInnes, who is a regular on Fox News also was a contributor until August 2017. His last column was entitled “So Long, Taki!” He has been described in media reports as a major figure within the alt-right movement. Gavin McInnes has also been featured in Hatewatch articles by the Southern Poverty Law Center, that can be found here and here.

      Taki’s Magazine features syndicated columns by such conservative figures as Pat Buchanan and Michelle Malkin, both of whom have mixed records with fact checkers. Taki’s Magazine published an article, “The Talk: Nonblack Version” written by John Derbyshire which makes questionable racial suggestions. Overall, we rate Taki’s Magazine as Questionable based on extreme right wing editorial bias and affiliation with those who have been labeled as promoters of hate. (M. Huitsing 9/18/2017)

      Like

      1. The whole week has crossed the line. Kind of the point. Let’s get it all out.

        Like

      2. Again
        If it does not fit your narrative it is racist.
        I am not a racist and even if I was one I have no power.
        I am on the side of the oppressed not the oppressor .
        Kman
        Liberal sources used to distinguish alternative thoughts.
        I guess you will vote to send me to a re-education camp. Right?
        It worked in Red 🇨🇳 China

        Like

        1. Maybe a Nitter camp. You might look good dressed in white. You say you aren’t but really?

          Tex whose great grandparents had crosses burned by the KKK on their farm. Maybe because they weren’t ‘white’ enough.

          Seriously man , open your mind and heart.

          This is about police brutality. And it’s more likely to happen if you are poor or non white.

          Tex

          Like

        2. Kman it’s literally about bringing justice to cops who have broken the law. That’s it. That’s all. Today there is literally no justice for unarmed people who have been needlessly brutalized, black or white.

          Here is one example of one time justice was served. It was served to a white man whose family had means to hire a lawyer, and even his lawyer said it was a long shot. The issue…as Tex pointed out … is that the brutalizing of unarmed men happens disproportionately more to blacks than it does to whites.

          Like

            1. I think that’s an extreme position. Certainly some are taking it. Not me. I can’t speak for the players I quoted above but it doesn’t seem like they are asking you, or anyone to do that.

              Like

        3. No one said you are a racist, but you did recommend a racist web site. Richard Spenser, former editor of the site believes in white supremacy.

          Like

    2. Sailor is trying to reframe the conversation. The issue at hand is excessive force against UNARMED black people. Sailer’s data speaks to overall homocide rate which is likely committed by armed perpetrators. It shouldn’t even be in the conversation. It should be A conversation bc it’s important, but it’s not part of THiS conversation which is about a police officer with a history of violence choking a man to death.

      Said another way: Floyd did not have a gun and he was fully subdued and under the control of the officer. Yet the officer continued to apply excessive force. Why? Was it Because black people commit more homicides per capita? Unlikely.

      Look,police work is hard. And without police society would disintegrate. And in an armed on armed situation all bets are off. But when cops are killing CLEARLY unarmed men of any color, that’s an issue. And it just so happens that many of the unarmed men that are killed or brutalized by police happen to be black.

      I believe that All the Pitt players I quoted above (and most Black people) simply want justice when a clear injustice has occurred. Is that too much to ask?

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Gee whiz, is there any one on this site who thinks that excessive force was not used on George Floyd?I I have read all comments I think twice and I can’t recall anyone saying that excessive force was not used. How then can that be the issue, MM?
        I do think context is important especially in light of how many people have been killed from these terrible events. Question: How many Black Americans were killed in 2019 by cops by use of excessive force? That seems to be a reasonable question to anyone trying to argue that a poster has mis-framed the issues. And just to be clear whether the person killed had a weapon or not is not the definitive factual predicate. Michael Brown did not have a weapon and AG Holder did not determine that his civil rights were violated by his killing.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Exactly, I don’t think there is one person in the entire world that doesn’t think the George Floyd killing wasn’t a crime by police brutality. So in order to get to the reasons and causes all aspects of life need to be examined and talked about responsibly. Of course, it would be insensitive to bring up Floyd’s criminal past as it is not a valid reason for the way he was treated and 8 long minutes and 45 seconds later, murdered! Never the less.

          Like

          1. Would it?

            In 2009, Floyd served a five-year prison sentence as part of a plea deal on the 2007 charge of aggravated robbery with a deadly weapon, reports the Houston Chronicle.

            One of his Houston pals, Ronnie Lillard, told the BBC that he became involved in his local ministry, Resurrection Houston, after being freed from jail.

            I looked deeper. Floyd committed armed robbery in 2007. It was his last documented crime prior to trying to cash a forged check. 13 years of either being a really good criminal (unlikely given his history) or actually finding the straight and narrow as per above.

            On the other hand Chauvin has 18 complaints against him. No details on what they are.

            Another officer on the scene had 6. And a lawsuit

            The other two had none.

            These complaint data and Floyd’s 13 years arrest free are facts. Make of them what you will.

            Like

          2. I can tell you who didn’t think George Floyd’s murder was police brutality: the Minneapolis Police Department.

            If they did, it wouldn’t have taken the protests for him to be taken into custody.

            Liked by 1 person

  65. Thought the article on Narduzzi and the dialogue held was interesting and I am glad for the team that they had an open discussion. I hope it creates a better atmosphere within the program.

    I’ve never thought of the word “thug” as a racial slur. Its a word that I have used without regard to race. As a hockey fan, I’ve been referring to a number of NHL players in this way. (Tom Wilson of the Capitals being one such guy)

    I sought some additional insight via Google (“thug definition”) and found this to be a bit enlightening:

    https://www.npr.org/2015/04/30/403362626/the-racially-charged-meaning-behind-the-word-thug

    As someone who travels extensively in my role in a global company, I’ve learned (sometimes the hard way) that words, gestures and actions can have different reactions depending on the audience. For instance, if you came to my house to watch a Pitt game on TV and crossed you legs revealing the bottom of your shoe, I wouldn’t give it a second thought beyond that you looked relaxed. But I’d never do that in Dubai, Saudi Arabia, Morocco, etc. – its insulting to the Arab culture.

    One can choose to be deaf to this stuff or file the knowledge of the “thug” connotation to their cultural toolbox and be mindful of one’s audience before using it. IMO its a simple choice and not difficult.

    Back to Narduzzi and the team….looks like a door to more honest discussion was opened and the culture new members of the FB team will encounter will be different. The path that got them where they seem to be apppears awkward, but good for the players for speaking up and Narduzzi for listening. Sounds like the coach had to endure some shots that he had coming. Lets hope that in addition to the players, that coaches of color will also guide him going forward. As he said, players learn from coaches, but coaches also learn from players.

    Liked by 3 people

  66. Have a ball Fran!

    If we all shared the same opinions this place would be very boring.
    I agree that it is a rare occurrence when someone’s opinion is changed.

    They call it the Status Quo for a reason, change is difficult and painful.

    Like

  67. @Huff, apologies for the shaming and disrespect you perceived, you seem sensitive so maybe that claim of dealing with things without emotion needs tweaking

    you state “as an illustration” the comment….
    “I made a decision not to post on the topic and tvax tried to shame me for doing it. There was no understanding of my point of view or my decision not to address the topic. Did you ever think about just RESPECTING my decision to not comment tvax? If so, I missed that sentence. That’s the problem of all of this in a nutshell. No RESPECT. The internet has given everyone an emotional and oft time a reactionary voice and the velocity of voice travels and collects momentum at such speed that thoughtful discussion or discourse cannot occur. I take emotion out of most all I do.”

    well, i can tell you your illustration is completely incorrect if you are assuming i am one who doesn’t want to hear”
    my response: 1. there is no UNDERSTANDING if you don’t state a point of view 2. you DID address the topic by stating your NON-ADDRESS 3. If you wanted to not comment, you should have not NOT COMMENTED,,,easier to respect, nothing to “miss” 4. RESPECT should go both ways, assumptions should not so I will not add mine

    it was simply more about you posting essentially that you have the “clarity” and know the answers but for whatever reason feel the need to simply announce that but then not enlighten the unwashed masses

    i was more subtle when you did the same regarding masks some time ago

    i’ll not comment on any more of your non-comments but if you feel you are in a position to help others, i recommend that you try to do so.
    here’s a suggestion, post anon, then you can really help the POV world with altruism(please don’t take that as emotional or sarcastic or intended to be negative whatsoever)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. If you guys see Heather, tell her I luv Pitt and I’m doing my best to get her fired.

      Tex who would hire Louis riddick as AD

      Like

      1. She needs two more years IMO. Her changes are just starting to take effect.

        Like

        1. I’ll give her the two. She’s using pitt for a big 10 Job anyway and will be gone come 2023. But I have Luis riddick on speed dial. He’s my age, my gen, knows bad football. He’d be perfect. Plus he’s smart and not white. Call me racist. Even sexist. Don’t care. When 70 percent of student athletes are black, don’t you think Pitt needs a black AD? I do.

          Tex

          Like

  68. Ok, got wordpressed again, let me try this again…

    I respect that MM has decided to discuss this issue even if it violates previous etiquette, some times you need to make exceptions, and it is his blog and therefore his prerogative to do so.

    That said, I look forward to the day when we can go back to discussing sports, and there are actual sports to discuss.

    H2P

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I agree. Let’s talk about how many games Pitt will win or lose due to covid forfeits. I think Pitt stands a real good chance at winning more than losing since Pitt is one of the few schools that take health more seriously than wins. And Pitt has far less to lose revenue wise. Follow the money people. Those schools most likely to break the rules are those most hurt by social distancing. It’s easy math and economics. I don’t need my Tardis to see this one coming.

      Tex who won’t spill the beans on what happens in 2026

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      1. I am not sure what to think about football yet; looking like ncaa will play ball, but how will they handle fans/crowd? Personally, I wouldn’t think twice about going to a game, others live in fear for various reasons, but what will be permitted? Any chance basketball games will be played with fans in 2020?

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  69. This is from a while back. Yes it is from a conservative site but the conversation is not conservative. It covers black issues from a BLM perspective. Very educational. It is long. Enjoy.

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  70. well, if Heather does leave, she’ll leave Pitt athletics in much better shape than her 2 predecessors … but of course, that wasn’t hard to do

    BTW, the Steelers will be holding pre-season camp at Heinz Field. NFL mandates that a certain room between lockers left them no option … and they may be using all 4 lockerrooms there. (FYI – Pitt’s is larger than Steelers)

    There was allegedly a very comprehensive story in the PG yesterday about how Pitt will be conducting voluntary workouts, already begun, as well as plans for August

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  71. ^^ So Mike, Floyd with a long history of serious crimes committed and was being apprehended for committing a very small crime with fentanyl in his system. of course I don’t have to say that he didn’t deserve this ending to his life but please don’t tell me his was living a good christian life. He had or was turning his life around is a very familiar refrain we often hear during these terrible times. Chuvin deserves to spend the most of his life behind bars and there is no defending his killing of Floyd while in handcuffs.

    The reason I even mention this is because I’m reading lots of statistics on the disparity of police brutality between different races. I’m stepping off this article for good now.

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    1. No Ike you are right. If he’d truly found religion he’d have gone to the church for financial help and not been on dope. Threw that in there to see what ppl would say.

      But the fact remains that – as you pointed out – a life was taken. Taking emotion out…two wrongs don’t mKe a right. When you add in amahad aubrry who was jogging in Georgia (not killed by cop but no justice severed until twitter outrage surfaced) recently plus ppl being crazy from covid lockdowns… well there you go

      https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2020/05/10/ahmaud-arbery-shooting-new-video-shows-georgia-jogger-did-nothing-illegal/3105123001/

      Oh and let’s not forget Breonna Taylor. All this has happened since May of this year. https://www.nbcnews.com/news/amp/ncna1205651

      How many more incidents go unrecorded?

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      1. I agree that perhaps the larger scale issue is that had the videos not publicly surfaced for two of these killings, the accused would be scot-free right now. And based on the police report of the third, there is likely to be no charges levied …. of course, if you are a conservative, you are likely to side with them, and just the opposite for most liberals.

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